News 2017-10-17T15:25:47+00:00

UPCOMING DJERRASI RESIDENCY / WORKSHOP

Rutstein is invited to a second art/science workshop on Ocean Memory at the Djerassi
Resident Artists Program, March 4-10, 2018. This workshop is funded by the National
Academy of Sciences / Keck Futures Initiative.
Since its inception in 1979, the Djerassi Program has hosted over 2300 artists and scientists
for residencies on a rustic and remote landscape in Northern California.
http://djerassi.org/
 

Rebecca Rutstein Works Acquired by the Pennsylvania Academy of Fine Arts Museum

Bridgette Mayer Gallery in Philadelphia is pleased to announce that The Pennsylvania Academy of Fine Arts Museum has added two Rebecca Rutstein works from 2017 to their collection. The Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts is a museum and art school in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. It was founded in 1805 and is the first and oldest art museum and art school in the United States. Bridgette Mayer commented: “Rebecca and I are thrilled to have her works grace the collection of PAFA’s museum and be able to be shared by a broader audience. Rebecca has been working and exhibiting in Philadelphia and beyond for twenty years and this is a very exciting moment for her.” For more information on Rutstein’s work please visit www.bridgettemayergallery.com

Artist/Scientist Collaborative Workshop on San Juan Island, WA

Funded by the National Academies Keck Futures Initiative

Friday Harbor Laboratories, University of Washington, Sept 19 – 25, 2017

Rutstein is invited to be a participant in an Artist/Scientist Collaborative Workshop called “Ocean Memory” at University of Washington’s, Friday Harbor Laboratories, on San Juan Island off the Pacific Coast.  

The collective goal will be to reach across wildly divergent scientific and artistic practices to broaden understanding and awareness of all ways in which the ocean, especially the deep ocean, may retain and express memory.

The program has been developed by:

Tim Broderick / Wright State Research Institute
Daniel Kohn / Artist, Kohn Workshop
Alyson Santoro / Marine Microbiology, University of California at Santa Barbara
Jody Deming / Marine Microbiology, University of Washington
Margot Knight / Director, Djerassi Artist Residency

NY Hall of Science, New York, NY

“Ocean” Exhibition

Sept 16, 2017 – Feb 28, 2018

Opening reception, Sun Oct 1, 3-5pm

This international exhibition organized by Art & Science Collaborations, Inc., asks artists and scientists to help create a new public perception of OCEAN by sharing creative visions of our deep connections to her, the health issues she faces and/or possible solutions, and feelings she inspires in us.

Bishop Museum, Honolulu, HI

Artist at Sea: Traveling Exhibition with Schmidt Ocean Institute

August 29–September 29, 2017

Work created on the Falkor Research Vessel is on view at the Bishop Museum following exhibitions at the San Francisco International Ocean Film Festival, Monterrey Bay Aquarium, and America’s Cup in Bermuda. The exhibition will continue to Newport, Rhode Island in October, and then to Scripps Ocean Institute in San Diego.

https://www.bishopmuseum.org/artists-at-sea/

 

Solo Exhibition at Cornell University

Rebecca Rutstein: Convergence

August 18–September 29, 2017
John Hartell Gallery
Cornell University
College of Architecture, Art & Planning
129 Sibley Dome
Ithaca, NY 14853

Reception Friday, September 15, 5 p.m.
Artist talk at reception

For more information:

 

 

In 2015, Philadelphia-based artist Rebecca Rutstein (B.F.A. ’93) was invited to join scientists on the Nautilus exploration vessel for an expedition aimed at sea mapping the ocean floor from the Galápagos Islands to California. This cross-disciplinary exchange between scientists and artists is something Rutstein deeply values. For nearly 20 years, Rutstein has completed site-specific art residencies in geologically dynamic environments including Iceland, Hawaii, the Canadian Rockies, and Vermont. She returned to sea with the research vessel Falkor in 2016 to explore uncharted territory from Vietnam to Guam. While at sea and back in her studio, Rutstein has worked with high-resolution mapping data of the ocean floor collected by the ships’ multibeam sonar technology.

For Rutstein, geologic forces — from gradual erosion to violent upheaval — are powerful metaphors for life experiences and the ebbs and flows of relationships. Her paintings become mappings where scale is shifted and obscured, articulating fractal patterns found in nature. Rutstein constructs spaces through juxtapositions — micro and macro, graphic and atmospheric, organic and geometric, positive and negative, and linear and solid. Her work explores tensions created by these polarities.Convergence is a survey of Rutstein’s recent work that explores geometric abstraction inspired by science, data, and maps.

Rutstein’s interest in geology was initially sparked at Cornell University, where she took a geology course that shaped her artistic pursuits long after her time there. Seeing and learning firsthand about Ithaca’s exceptional exposure of sedimentary rocks carved by glacial and erosive forces was profoundly inspiring. It wasn’t until years after pursuing her M.F.A. that she saw a pathway to incorporate geologic themes into her paintings.

Rutstein’s work spans painting, installation, sculpture, and public art. She has exhibited widely in the U.S. and has received numerous grants including a Pew Fellowship in the Arts and an Independence Foundation Fellowship. Rutstein has garnered recent attention through interviews and features on NPR, Huffington Post, and Vice magazine, and her works can be found in public collections including Johns Hopkins Hospital, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Fox Chase Cancer Center, and Temple University. Rutstein holds a B.F.A. from Cornell University and an M.F.A. from the University of Pennsylvania and is represented by Bridgette Mayer Gallery in Philadelphia and Zane Bennett Contemporary/Form and Concept in Santa Fe.

UPCOMING DJERRASI RESIDENCY / WORKSHOP

Rutstein is invited to a second art/science workshop on Ocean Memory at the Djerassi
Resident Artists Program, March 4-10, 2018. This workshop is funded by the National
Academy of Sciences / Keck Futures Initiative.
Since its inception in 1979, the Djerassi Program has hosted over 2300 artists and scientists
for residencies on a rustic and remote landscape in Northern California.
http://djerassi.org/
 

Rebecca Rutstein Works Acquired by the Pennsylvania Academy of Fine Arts Museum

Bridgette Mayer Gallery in Philadelphia is pleased to announce that The Pennsylvania Academy of Fine Arts Museum has added two Rebecca Rutstein works from 2017 to their collection. The Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts is a museum and art school in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. It was founded in 1805 and is the first and oldest art museum and art school in the United States. Bridgette Mayer commented: “Rebecca and I are thrilled to have her works grace the collection of PAFA’s museum and be able to be shared by a broader audience. Rebecca has been working and exhibiting in Philadelphia and beyond for twenty years and this is a very exciting moment for her.” For more information on Rutstein’s work please visit www.bridgettemayergallery.com

Artist/Scientist Collaborative Workshop on San Juan Island, WA

Funded by the National Academies Keck Futures Initiative

Friday Harbor Laboratories, University of Washington, Sept 19 – 25, 2017

Rutstein is invited to be a participant in an Artist/Scientist Collaborative Workshop called “Ocean Memory” at University of Washington’s, Friday Harbor Laboratories, on San Juan Island off the Pacific Coast.  

The collective goal will be to reach across wildly divergent scientific and artistic practices to broaden understanding and awareness of all ways in which the ocean, especially the deep ocean, may retain and express memory.

The program has been developed by:

Tim Broderick / Wright State Research Institute
Daniel Kohn / Artist, Kohn Workshop
Alyson Santoro / Marine Microbiology, University of California at Santa Barbara
Jody Deming / Marine Microbiology, University of Washington
Margot Knight / Director, Djerassi Artist Residency

NY Hall of Science, New York, NY

“Ocean” Exhibition

Sept 16, 2017 – Feb 28, 2018

Opening reception, Sun Oct 1, 3-5pm

This international exhibition organized by Art & Science Collaborations, Inc., asks artists and scientists to help create a new public perception of OCEAN by sharing creative visions of our deep connections to her, the health issues she faces and/or possible solutions, and feelings she inspires in us.

Bishop Museum, Honolulu, HI

Artist at Sea: Traveling Exhibition with Schmidt Ocean Institute

August 29–September 29, 2017

Work created on the Falkor Research Vessel is on view at the Bishop Museum following exhibitions at the San Francisco International Ocean Film Festival, Monterrey Bay Aquarium, and America’s Cup in Bermuda. The exhibition will continue to Newport, Rhode Island in October, and then to Scripps Ocean Institute in San Diego.

https://www.bishopmuseum.org/artists-at-sea/

 

Solo Exhibition at Cornell University

Rebecca Rutstein: Convergence

August 18–September 29, 2017
John Hartell Gallery
Cornell University
College of Architecture, Art & Planning
129 Sibley Dome
Ithaca, NY 14853

Reception Friday, September 15, 5 p.m.
Artist talk at reception

For more information:

 

 

In 2015, Philadelphia-based artist Rebecca Rutstein (B.F.A. ’93) was invited to join scientists on the Nautilus exploration vessel for an expedition aimed at sea mapping the ocean floor from the Galápagos Islands to California. This cross-disciplinary exchange between scientists and artists is something Rutstein deeply values. For nearly 20 years, Rutstein has completed site-specific art residencies in geologically dynamic environments including Iceland, Hawaii, the Canadian Rockies, and Vermont. She returned to sea with the research vessel Falkor in 2016 to explore uncharted territory from Vietnam to Guam. While at sea and back in her studio, Rutstein has worked with high-resolution mapping data of the ocean floor collected by the ships’ multibeam sonar technology.

For Rutstein, geologic forces — from gradual erosion to violent upheaval — are powerful metaphors for life experiences and the ebbs and flows of relationships. Her paintings become mappings where scale is shifted and obscured, articulating fractal patterns found in nature. Rutstein constructs spaces through juxtapositions — micro and macro, graphic and atmospheric, organic and geometric, positive and negative, and linear and solid. Her work explores tensions created by these polarities.Convergence is a survey of Rutstein’s recent work that explores geometric abstraction inspired by science, data, and maps.

Rutstein’s interest in geology was initially sparked at Cornell University, where she took a geology course that shaped her artistic pursuits long after her time there. Seeing and learning firsthand about Ithaca’s exceptional exposure of sedimentary rocks carved by glacial and erosive forces was profoundly inspiring. It wasn’t until years after pursuing her M.F.A. that she saw a pathway to incorporate geologic themes into her paintings.

Rutstein’s work spans painting, installation, sculpture, and public art. She has exhibited widely in the U.S. and has received numerous grants including a Pew Fellowship in the Arts and an Independence Foundation Fellowship. Rutstein has garnered recent attention through interviews and features on NPR, Huffington Post, and Vice magazine, and her works can be found in public collections including Johns Hopkins Hospital, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Fox Chase Cancer Center, and Temple University. Rutstein holds a B.F.A. from Cornell University and an M.F.A. from the University of Pennsylvania and is represented by Bridgette Mayer Gallery in Philadelphia and Zane Bennett Contemporary/Form and Concept in Santa Fe.

UPCOMING DJERRASI RESIDENCY / WORKSHOP

Rutstein is invited to a second art/science workshop on Ocean Memory at the Djerassi
Resident Artists Program, March 4-10, 2018. This workshop is funded by the National
Academy of Sciences / Keck Futures Initiative.
Since its inception in 1979, the Djerassi Program has hosted over 2300 artists and scientists
for residencies on a rustic and remote landscape in Northern California.
http://djerassi.org/
 

Rebecca Rutstein Works Acquired by the Pennsylvania Academy of Fine Arts Museum

Bridgette Mayer Gallery in Philadelphia is pleased to announce that The Pennsylvania Academy of Fine Arts Museum has added two Rebecca Rutstein works from 2017 to their collection. The Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts is a museum and art school in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. It was founded in 1805 and is the first and oldest art museum and art school in the United States. Bridgette Mayer commented: “Rebecca and I are thrilled to have her works grace the collection of PAFA’s museum and be able to be shared by a broader audience. Rebecca has been working and exhibiting in Philadelphia and beyond for twenty years and this is a very exciting moment for her.” For more information on Rutstein’s work please visit www.bridgettemayergallery.com

Artist/Scientist Collaborative Workshop on San Juan Island, WA

Funded by the National Academies Keck Futures Initiative

Friday Harbor Laboratories, University of Washington, Sept 19 – 25, 2017

Rutstein is invited to be a participant in an Artist/Scientist Collaborative Workshop called “Ocean Memory” at University of Washington’s, Friday Harbor Laboratories, on San Juan Island off the Pacific Coast.  

The collective goal will be to reach across wildly divergent scientific and artistic practices to broaden understanding and awareness of all ways in which the ocean, especially the deep ocean, may retain and express memory.

The program has been developed by:

Tim Broderick / Wright State Research Institute
Daniel Kohn / Artist, Kohn Workshop
Alyson Santoro / Marine Microbiology, University of California at Santa Barbara
Jody Deming / Marine Microbiology, University of Washington
Margot Knight / Director, Djerassi Artist Residency

NY Hall of Science, New York, NY

“Ocean” Exhibition

Sept 16, 2017 – Feb 28, 2018

Opening reception, Sun Oct 1, 3-5pm

This international exhibition organized by Art & Science Collaborations, Inc., asks artists and scientists to help create a new public perception of OCEAN by sharing creative visions of our deep connections to her, the health issues she faces and/or possible solutions, and feelings she inspires in us.

Bishop Museum, Honolulu, HI

Artist at Sea: Traveling Exhibition with Schmidt Ocean Institute

August 29–September 29, 2017

Work created on the Falkor Research Vessel is on view at the Bishop Museum following exhibitions at the San Francisco International Ocean Film Festival, Monterrey Bay Aquarium, and America’s Cup in Bermuda. The exhibition will continue to Newport, Rhode Island in October, and then to Scripps Ocean Institute in San Diego.

https://www.bishopmuseum.org/artists-at-sea/

 

Solo Exhibition at Cornell University

Rebecca Rutstein: Convergence

August 18–September 29, 2017
John Hartell Gallery
Cornell University
College of Architecture, Art & Planning
129 Sibley Dome
Ithaca, NY 14853

Reception Friday, September 15, 5 p.m.
Artist talk at reception

For more information:

 

 

In 2015, Philadelphia-based artist Rebecca Rutstein (B.F.A. ’93) was invited to join scientists on the Nautilus exploration vessel for an expedition aimed at sea mapping the ocean floor from the Galápagos Islands to California. This cross-disciplinary exchange between scientists and artists is something Rutstein deeply values. For nearly 20 years, Rutstein has completed site-specific art residencies in geologically dynamic environments including Iceland, Hawaii, the Canadian Rockies, and Vermont. She returned to sea with the research vessel Falkor in 2016 to explore uncharted territory from Vietnam to Guam. While at sea and back in her studio, Rutstein has worked with high-resolution mapping data of the ocean floor collected by the ships’ multibeam sonar technology.

For Rutstein, geologic forces — from gradual erosion to violent upheaval — are powerful metaphors for life experiences and the ebbs and flows of relationships. Her paintings become mappings where scale is shifted and obscured, articulating fractal patterns found in nature. Rutstein constructs spaces through juxtapositions — micro and macro, graphic and atmospheric, organic and geometric, positive and negative, and linear and solid. Her work explores tensions created by these polarities.Convergence is a survey of Rutstein’s recent work that explores geometric abstraction inspired by science, data, and maps.

Rutstein’s interest in geology was initially sparked at Cornell University, where she took a geology course that shaped her artistic pursuits long after her time there. Seeing and learning firsthand about Ithaca’s exceptional exposure of sedimentary rocks carved by glacial and erosive forces was profoundly inspiring. It wasn’t until years after pursuing her M.F.A. that she saw a pathway to incorporate geologic themes into her paintings.

Rutstein’s work spans painting, installation, sculpture, and public art. She has exhibited widely in the U.S. and has received numerous grants including a Pew Fellowship in the Arts and an Independence Foundation Fellowship. Rutstein has garnered recent attention through interviews and features on NPR, Huffington Post, and Vice magazine, and her works can be found in public collections including Johns Hopkins Hospital, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Fox Chase Cancer Center, and Temple University. Rutstein holds a B.F.A. from Cornell University and an M.F.A. from the University of Pennsylvania and is represented by Bridgette Mayer Gallery in Philadelphia and Zane Bennett Contemporary/Form and Concept in Santa Fe.